Teresa Leger Fernandez and Cindy Pabst Petitioning for Signatures

Did someone say petitioning is fun? Well, it can be. Sometimes you meet nice people who are happy to sign your candidate petition. They may even appreciate your efforts to step up and do the heavy lifting and thank you for your volunteerism. All smiles and happiness could be the result of your interaction with a voter.

Or not.  

Did someone say petitioning is fun? Well, it can be. Sometimes you meet nice people who are happy to sign your candidate petition. They may even appreciate your efforts to step up and do the heavy lifting and thank you for your volunteerism. All smiles and happiness could be the result of your interaction with a voter.

And when that happens, here’s what will help you keep your composure. Just remember that it is not YOU being rejected. It may not even be your candidate being rejected. It’s just that some people don’t want to participate in the electoral process. As simple as that. In your desire to get as many signatures as possible, you might be tempted to politely convince someone to sign. Or suggest why it’s important to do so. Best practices by professionals in the field suggest otherwise. 

Rather than antagonize, be courteous. Smile. Say, “Okay. Thank you.”  Remember – it’s all about the candidate. It’s not about you. Arguing or cajoling could jeopardize the standing your candidate has, potentially, with this voter. 

One more thing, you may also be driven off the property of a chain store, or from a mall. From their point of view, you are obstructing their ability to do business with customers. If you get shooed away, find the nearest sidewalk to the store. Don’t argue. Just walk away. Your goal is to get your candidate on the ballot – and, later, elected. 

Better yet, try your luck at a local store by asking first if you can petition in front of their shop.

Bottom line – we want signatures and votes. Goodwill gets that. Don’t antagonize. It doesn’t help us get to the end result. BLUE in 22.